Is Mitchum Cruelty Free?

mitchum deodorants

Mitchum deodorants are a popular and recognisable brand, but are you subsidising animal testing by using them? 

Sadly, like many brands, Mitchum sells their products to mainland China, where testing is still mandatory on many products. 

Luckily we’ve spent our time finding you some great cruelty-free alternatives to keep your conscience clear and your armpits dry. 

Keep reading to learn about the vegan, cruelty-free and sustainable products we’ve selected just for you. 

Vegomm score: 50%

– Brand is certified vegan: NO
– Brand offers a selection of vegan products: YES
– Brand tests on animals: NO
– Brand is sold in mainland China: YES
– Parent company tests other brands on animals: NO
– Parent company sells other cosmetic brands in China: YES

Is Mitchum Cruelty-free? 

It can’t be said that Mitchum deodorants are cruelty-free.

Revlon, their parent company (a multinational cosmetics and skincare company), however, states:

‘Revlon does not conduct animal testing and has not done so for decades.’

However, Mitchum has no clear animal testing policy on its own website. 

Plus, both Mitchum and other Revlon products are sold in mainland China, where testing on animals is a requirement for certain products.

Within Revlon’s animal testing policy, it states:

‘Regulatory authorities in some countries conduct independent testing in order to satisfy their own mandatory registration requirements, and a limited number of these countries have not yet adopted alternative testing methods.’

So does Mitchum test on animals? 

Because they sell their products in China, Mitchum’s and other Revlon’s products might be tested on animals by third parties, though they don’t do so directly.

Note that China’s animal testing policies changed in May 2021, meaning that many cosmetic products no longer need to be tested on animals. But many of Revlon’s products are likely still to fall into the category of needing to be tested. In particular, Revlon sells a number of products that include sun cream, which is not exempt from animal testing. 

However, while Mitchum’s products could now be sold in China without being tested, unless they involve new ingredients not previously sold there, they would still need to apply for a permit to forgo testing. And neither Revlon nor Mitchum state anywhere on their websites that they currently intend to apply for a permit.  

Is Mitchum vegan?

Neither Mitchum nor Revlon is vegan certified, though Revlon states that some of their products are vegan. 

(Some of Revlon’s products are marketed for vegans, such as their vegan hair dye. However, most of Revlon’s products are not, as they include ingredients such as lanolin and beeswax.) 

mitchum deodorants

Mitchum deodorant ingredients appear to be primarily vegan; however, many could be from either vegan or non-vegan origins, and very little information is available from the company about the origin of these ingredients. 

Moreover Mitchum have not labelled their products as vegan, and this could be because some of the ingredients are from animal-related products, or it could be that they cannot guarantee there has been no cross-contamination.

There is one exception, though: the “Natural Bamboo Deodorant”, as both men and women versions carry a vegan label  

But does that really make this Mitchum deodorant vegan?

That’s up to you… as far as we are concerned, as the brand is not cruelty-free we can’t endorse Mitchum as a brand “offering vegan products”, even though one of their products has a vegan label.

Cruelty-free alternatives

You might wonder if, beyond not being cruelty-free, Mitchum deodorants are good, at least? 

Though used by many people, Mitchum deodorant complaints include causing rashes, faulty packaging and not functioning as required. 

So why not give one of the many natural and 100% vegan and cruelty-free brands a go instead? Vegan deodorants are available in all forms, meaning cruelty-free alternatives to Mitchum deodorants are easy to find. 

We have a whole article listing our favourite vegan deodorants, but here below are some direct alternatives to Mitchum most famous options.

Alternative to Mitchum deodorant stick

Your Nature Natural Deodorant 

Your Nature Natural Deodorant

This vegan deodorant is a UK brand that seeks to use only natural ingredients wherever possible. Another great thing about this brand is they are plastic-free, opting for cardboard containers instead. 

Alternative to Mitchum deodorant spray

Salt of the Earth Natural Deodorant spray

Salt of the Earth Natural Deodorant spray

Salt of the Earth is a vegan certified brand that works hard to reduce its impact on the environment by reducing its packaging.

Alternative to Mitchum roll on

Faith in Nature Roll-On Deodorant

faith in nature deodorant

Faith in Nature is a well-established brand that makes a range of shampoos, shower gels and other bathroom products. They aim to have 100% recyclable packing as part of their belief in putting sustainability at the heart of all they do.

Alternative to Mitchum deodorant unscented

Jomingo Natural Deodorant

Jomingo Natural Deodorant

Jomingo is a vibrant brand that produces deodorants and lip and hand balms. They pack their products in biodegradable packaging to reduce their waste and avoid any potentially harmful ingredients such as parabens.

Alternative to Mitchum deodorant cream

Procoal Natural Deodorant Balm

procoal natural deodorant balm

Procoal is a relatively young company, established in 2016. They produce a number of products, from face masks, cleansers and teeth whitening powder. They aim to use tried and tested ingredients that are beneficial to your skin while not being harmful to the planet.

Final thoughts

Unfortunately, as with many brands, Mitchum do not offer much transparency about their policy on animal testing or whether their ingredients are vegan. 

The fact that Mitchum has released a deodorant that is labelled vegan is undoubtedly a step in the right direction (or is it just a way for them to reduce the pressure from vegan customers?).

However, to truly be cruelty-free, they and their parent company need to go through the new permitting system introduced by China to ensure their products are not tested on animals. 

Hopefully, this move isn’t far away, but until that day, Mitchum is sadly well and truly not the ethical choice.  

Other skincare brands we’ve reviewed

Morphe

Vaseline

Ponds

Benefit

Nivea

CeraVe